Monthly Archives: June 2007

Postcard crazy!

Happy Birthday postcard trio of postcards second trio of postcards

I went nuts with the flower postcards, ‘cuz they’re so easy to make! I used wildflowers from my yard for these postcards. Happy Birthday is embroidered by hand, and the edge is machine embroidery. I tried out some plain and figured organza; I think for the right person/occasion, the figured organza is perfect. Plain organza is better for showing off the flower. Be sure to select each photo above to enlarge.

I’m working on a tutorial, but the short version is: enclose the flower in a sandwich of heavy duty fabric stabilizer (the bottom layer), fusible web, the flower, fusible web on top of the flower, and the last (and top) layer is organza. Iron enough to fuse the web to the flower and the fabric (but don’t over-iron, or you’ll cook the flower), put a layer of plain white cotton on the back of the heavy duty fabric stabilizer, then sew around the edge to seal permanently. It’s so easy! I have a couple more projects to try, using fresh flowers and fusible web, as soon as I get time.

I found the original instructions at Stitch Magazine, and the author (Pamela Watts) bonds the flower to cotton and then to a card, which I haven’t tried yet. But there’s always birthday cards to make, so I’ll be trying that soon. Anyway, I hope you try this-it is so fun, so easy!

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More of Colette’s angels

Colette’s Kindspirit, front Colette’s Kindspirit - back Colette's Lovespirit

Colette made some angels earlier; here’s a new one, Kindspirit, Colette’s dream for all of us. I included a better picture of Lovespirit too. Her angels enhance her life by giving her dreams, and love, and freedom. Be sure to select each image to see the details that make these angels sing!

Refashioned shirt

plaid shirt revitalized!

At last! I’ve finally gotten started on some of my refashioning projects! This was so simple – new buttons and some embroidery thread. It sure did perk up this well-loved plaid shirt though. Select each image for a close-up view.

plaid shirt placket the inside of the button plackets

I started by ironing the inside plackets on the shirt, handsewing them down to lay flat so I don’t have to iron it any more. I whipstitched the front closed too, up to the second button from the top. I’m so lazy! I don’t like buttoning up a shirt, and I usually leave it buttoned and pull it on over my head. Then the old buttons came off, and the new ones went on. Depending on the length of the button shank, I either sewed the buttonhole closed or sewed the button through the button hole.

embroidery down the front ladybug button strawberry button

Next I embroidered the vine and flowers down the front of the shirt, with a simple feather stitch and single chain stitch. I chose a simple design with bright colors because I knew getting to the middle of the front might be difficult. It ended up being easier than I thought, so I may add some beads to the vine.

plaid shirt collar shirt collar

The shirt still wasn’t lively enough, so I added embroidery on the collar edge, as well as some very tiny buttons. I think another set of stitches to secure the bottom herringbone stitches is in the works; maybe even a bead or two.

plaid shirt pocket plaid shirt pocket

Lastly, I embellished the pocket with the same design and buttons as the collar. A new easier-care shirt that’s soft and comfy!

Although I did all the work by hand, you can certainly get the same effect faster with the sewing machine. I happen to enjoy the rhythmic Zen-ness of handwork and like the chance to work slowly and quietly. I worked on this shirt outside sitting next to a campfire, and yes, chased a few mosquitos off at the same time!

Another NSNG angel

Colleen’s angel - front Colleen’s angel - back

Here is The Blues Angel, Colleen’s flat angel from the class I taught at the North Star Needlework Guild. I love her feet and hands; what a great idea! I don’t know what her story is… I hope she’s not havin’ the blues! And there’s more to come… after the next meeting 🙂